Boultham Park Digital Map

Boultham Park Digital Map
Boultham Park Cafe Boultham Hall Boultham Fountain The Glasshouse Children's Playground St Helen's Church Boultham Bandstand Boultham Lake Boultham Beacon Viewing Platforms Boating Fishing The Giant Redwood Railway Poplar Alder Tree Willow Trees Wildflowers

Boultham Park Cafe

Built in 2017 as part of the park's restoration, the park cafe is operated by Linkage, the learning disability charity. It is open 10-3 on most days, and serves drinks, homemade cakes, and food.

Boultham Hall

The 1200 acre Boultham estate was owned by the Ellison family until it was sold in 1913. The City of Lincoln bought the estate in 1929 and the gardens were laid out as a public park. The hall was used as a military hospital during World War 1, and its grounds for the dig for victory campaign in World War 2. Unable to find a suitable use for the dilapidated building, Boultham Hall was finally demolished in 1959.

Boultham Fountain

The Boultham Park Fountain has always been a  part of the Boultham Estate. It is believed that it was never built to function but just for decoration, or as a bird bath.

The Glasshouse

In 1874 the Ellisons added a large glasshouse structure as a part of the rebuilding of Boultham Hall. It was mostly used to produce flora and fauna for the gardens, and later for all the green spaces in the city. The council continued to use the site up to 1996 when it was dismantled. As part of the Park Restoration Project a new glasshouse was built as a mini-garden centre for the Linkage College Students.

Children's Playground

Added to the park in 2011, there is a playground for small children on the north side of the park, and an area for older children on the other side of the lake.

St Helen's Church

St Helen's is a 13th century church, and was restored in 1837. The Ellison family thought of St Helens as their estate church and helped to refurbish it. The church is still used for occasional services.

Boultham Bandstand

The bandstand was built in 1936 after the estate was made a public park. It was unfortunately damaged by a fire in 2015, but was restored to its former glory in 2017 as part of the Park Restoration Project.

Boultham Lake

The lake was added to the Boultham Estate in 1851. In 2021 the lake was restored thanks to funding from the National Heritage Lottery Fund. The lake edges were restored, aeration systems were installed to improve water quality, footpaths and bridges were improved, and viewing platforms and additional seating were added around the lake.

Boultham Beacon

The Boultham Lake Beacon was made by volunteer Jon Pye for the Queen's jubilee in 2002, this was the only time the beacon has ever been ceremonially lit.

Viewing Platforms

Added as a part of the Lake Restoration Project in 2021, the viewing platforms are the perfect spot to relax and take in the lake and its inhabitants.

Boating

In the mid 20th century, boating was a popular activity on the lake, having to unfortunately stop in 1977 due to boats going missing. In 2021 a new boating platform was added to the south end of the lake, with intentions to bring back boating as an occasional public activity.

Fishing

As part of the Lake Restoration Project, dedicated fishing pegs were added to the northern end of the lake. These are available for use by anyone with a valid fishing permit.

The Giant Redwood

The park is host to a 19 metre Giant Redwood or Giant Sequoia. These first came from North America in 1853 and it would have been some time after that before they were available for purchase for the ‘average’ estate garden, and so we know this to be somewhat younger. This was originally part of a pair that sat either side of the main approach to the Hall, but the other specimen was removed in the 1990s due to its poor condition.

Railway Poplar

The Black 'Railway' poplar is Boultham Park's oldest tree at 200 years old, growing 40m high in the woodland to the north west of St Helen's Church. In 1983 it was recorded in the 'Champion Trees of Britain' book.

Alder Tree

The Alder trees around the like are a vital part of the lake's ecosystem. Their roots help prevent soil erosion at lake edges, they love water and the wood doesnt rot when water logged but actually becomes stronger and harder.

Willow Trees

Weeping Willow do well planted near water and their roots can prevent soil erosion, they also provide food for rabbits and dear, and their branches are ideal for nesting birds. They get their name from the way rain looks like tears when dripping off the curved branches.

Wildflowers

The planting around the lake is made up of native British wildflowers, these were planted as part of the Lake Restoration Project in order to attract vulnerable pollinators and diversify the park's habitats for other insects and birds. Some of these wildflowers include Meadow Sweet, Purple Loosestrife, Wild Angelica, Yellow Flag Iris and many others.